Penguin Group US


  • A stunning Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition of the activist artist's extraordinary journals
    Keith Haring is synonymous with the downtown New York art scene of the 1980's. His artwork-with its simple, bold lines and dynamic figures in motion-filtered in to the world's consciousness and is still instantly recognizable, twenty years after his death. This Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition features ninety black-and-white images of classic artwork and never-before-published Polaroid images, and is a remarkable glimpse of a man who, in his quest to become an artist, instead became an icon.

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

  • Anglais March

    Brooks Geraldine

    From Louisa May Alcott’s beloved classic Little Women, Geraldine Brooks has animated the character of the absent father, March, and crafted a story "filled with the ache of love and marriage and with the power of war upon the mind and heart of one unforgettable man" (Sue Monk Kidd). With"pitch-perfect writing" (USA Today), Brooks follows March as he leaves behind his family to aid the Union cause in the Civil War. His experiences will utterly change his marriage and challenge his most ardently held beliefs. A lushly written, wholly original tale steeped in the details of another time, March secures Geraldine Brooks’s place as a renowned author of historical fiction.

  • Before the fall premiere of the new television series, read the original legend of Ichabod Crane, the Headless Horseman, and the singularly spooky town of Sleepy Hollow in Washington Irving's classic book
    When Washington Irving first published this collection of essays, sketches, and tales-'originally entitled The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.-'readers greeted it with enthusiasm, and Irving emerged as America's first successful professional author.

    This volume includes "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle," two of America's most recognizable and loved works of fiction and displays Irving's ability to depict American landscapes and culture so vividly that readers feel themselves a part of them. And it is on the basis of these two classic tales that Irving is generally credited with inventing the short story as a distinct literary genre. Also included here are gently ironic pieces about life in England that reflect the author's interest in the traditions of the Old World and his longings for his home in the New.

  • Anglais My Antonia

    Cather Willa

    Willa Cather's My Ántonia is considered one of the most significant American novels of the twentieth century. Set during the great migration west to settle the plains of the North American continent, the narrative follows Antonia Shimerda, a pioneer who comes to Nebraska as a child and grows with the country, inspiring a childhood friend, Jim Burden, to write her life story. The novel is important both for its literary aesthetic and as a portrayal of important aspects of American social ideals and history, particularly the centrality of migration to American culture.

  • A masterpiece of modern fiction, James Joyce's semiautobiographical first novel follows Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive and creative youth who rebels against his family, his education, and his country by committing himself to the artist's life. 'I will not serve,' vows Dedalus, 'that in which I no longer believe...and I will try to express myself in some mode of life or art as freely as I can.' Likening himself to God, Dedalus notes that the artist 'remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent, paring his fingernails.' Joyce's rendering of the impressions of childhood broke ground in the use of language. 'He took on the almost infinite English language,' Jorge Luis Borges said once. 'He wrote in a language invented by himself....Joyce brought a new music to English.' A bold literary experiment, this classic has had a huge and lasting influence on the contemporary novel.
    With an Introduction by Langdon Hammer

  • Charles Dickenss satirical masterpiece, The Pickwick Papers, catapulted the young writer into literary fame when it was first serialized in 183637. It recounts the rollicking adventures of the members of the Pickwick Club as they travel about England getting into all sorts of mischief. Laugh-out-loud funny and endlessly entertaining, the book also reveals Dickenss burgeoning interest in the parliamentary system, lawyers, the Poor Laws, and the ills of debtors prisons. As G. K. Chesterton noted, Before [Dickens] wrote a single real story, he had a kind of vision . . . a map full of fantastic towns, thundering coaches, clamorous market-places, uproarious inns, strange and swaggering figures. That vision was Pickwick.

  • Anita has fallen for the leader of a local pack of werewolves. She?s survived a lot, but this love thing may kill her yet.

  • Anglais Bloody Bones

    Hamilton Laurell K

    A look that kills for the fifth Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter novel. Here's a job to strain even Anita Blake's capabilities: raising an entire graveyard of two-hundred-year-old corpses.

  • Cooper's most enduringly popular novel combines heroism and romance with powerful criticism of the destruction of nature and tradition.
    Set against the French and Indian siege of Fort William Henry in 1757, The Last of the Mohicans recounts the story of two sisters, Cora and Alice Munro, daughters of the English commander, who are struggling to be reunited with their father. They are aided in their perilous journey by Hawk-eye, a frontier scout and his companions Chingachgook and Uncas, the only two survivors of the Mohican tribe. But their lives are endangered by the Mangua, the savage Indian traitor who captures the sisters, wanting Cora to be his squaw.
    In setting Indian against Indian and the brutal society of the white man against the civilization of the Mohican, Cooper, more than any author before or since, shaped the American sense of itself as a nation.

  • Anglais The Underdogs

    Azuela Mariano

    The Underdogs
    Mariano Azuela
    Ten years after its publication in a small El Paso paper, The Underdogs achieved worldwide renown as the greatest novel of the Mexican Revolution. It tells the story of Demetrio Macías, a modest, peace-loving Indian, who is forced to side with the rebels to save his family. In the course of battle, he becomes a compulsive militarist almost despite himself, and his courage leads to a generalship in Pancho Villa's army. But as the rebels suffer defeat after defeat, Macías loses prestige and moral purpose at the hands of turncoats, camp followers, and the peasants who once loved him. The social conscience and bitter irony of Azuela's classic novel have earned him comparisons to Chekhov and Gorky. As Mexico continues to celebrate and struggle with the consequences of its great revolution, The Underdogs remains a powerful and insightful portrait of social upheaval.
    Translated by E. Munguia Jr.
    With an Introduction by Ana Castillo
    and an Afterword by Max Parra

  • After September 11th , Ahmed Rashid's crucial book Taliban introduced American readers to that now notorious regime. In this new work, he returns to Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Central Asia to review the catastrophic aftermath of America's failed war on terror. Called "Pakistan's best and bravest reporter" by Christopher Hitchens, Rashid has shown himself to be a voice of reason amid the chaos of present-day Central Asia. Descent Into Chaos is his blistering critique of American policy-a dire warning and an impassioned call to correct these disasterous strategies before these failing states threaten global stability and bring devastation to our world.

  • Anglais Twice Shy

    Francis Dick

    A computerized horse-betting system falls into Jonathan Derry's hands--and unless he returns it to the rightful owners, the odds of his survival are slim to none.

  • Anglais Longshot

    Francis Dick

    Jump in the saddle with a sure thing.
    Writer John Kendall travels to England to interview a racehorse trainer with something to hide-a secret that could threaten Kendall's life.

  • Originally subtitled "An Adventurous Education, 1935-1946," Vanity of Duluoz is a key volume in Jack Kerouac's lifework, the series of autobiographical novels he referred to as The Legend of Duluoz. With the same tender humor and intoxicating wordplay he brought to his masterpieces On the Road and The Dharma Bums, Kerouac takes his alter ego from the football fields of small-town New England to the playing fields and classrooms of Horace Mann and Columbia, out to sea on a merchant freighter plying the sub-infested waters of the North Atlantic during World War II, and back to New York, where his friends are the writers who would one day become known as the Beat generation and where he published his first novel.

    Written in 1967 from the vantage point ot the psychedelic sixties, Vanity of Duluoz gives a fascinating portrait of the young Kerouac, dedicated and disciplined in his determination from an early age to be an important American writer.

  • "What I'm beginning to discover now is something beyond the novel and beyond the arbitrary confines of the story. . . . I'm making myself seek to find the wild form, that can grow with my wild heart . . . because now I know MY HEART DOES GROW." -'Jack Kerouac, in a letter to John Clellon HolmesWritten in 1951-52, Visions of Cody was an underground legend by the time it was finally published in 1972. Writing in a radical, experimental form ("the New Journalism fifteen years early," as Dennis McNally noted in Desolate Angel), Kerouac created the ultimate account of his voyages with Neal Cassady during the late forties, which he captured in different form in On the Road. Here are the members of the Beat Generatoin as they were in the years before any label had been affixed to them. Here is the postwar America that Kerouac knew so well and celebrated so magnificently. His ecstatic sense of superabundant reality is informed by the knowledge of mortality: "I'm writing this book because we're all going to die. . . . My heart broke in the general despair and opened up inward to the Lord, I made a supplication in this dream.""The most sincere and holy writing I know of our age." -'Allen Ginsberg

  • Anglais Becoming Jane Eyre

    Kohler Sheila

    Read Sheila Kohler's posts on the Penguin Blog.
    A beautifully imagined tale of the Bronte sisters and the writing of Jane Eyre
    The year is
    1846. In a cold parsonage on the gloomy Yorkshire moors, a family seems cursed with disaster. A mother and two
    children dead. A father sick, without fortune, and hardened by the loss of his two most beloved family members. A son
    destroyed by alcohol and opiates. And three strong, intelligent young women, reduced to poverty and spinsterhood,
    with nothing to save them from their fate. Nothing, that is, except their remarkable literary talent.
    So
    unfolds the story of the Brontë sisters. At its center are Charlotte and the writing of Jane Eyre. Delicately
    unraveling the connections between one of fiction's most indelible heroines and the remarkable woman who created
    her, Sheila Kohler's Becoming Jane Eyre will appeal to fans of historical fiction and, of course, the millions of
    readers who adore Jane Eyre.

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA

  • Anglais Chasing the Flame

    Power Samantha

    In this perfect match of author and subject, Pulitzer Prize-winner Samantha Power tackles the life of Sergio Vieira de Mello, whose work for the U.N. before his 2003 death in Iraq was emblematic of moral struggle on the global stage. Power has drawn on a staggering breadth of research (including 400 interviews) to show us a heroic figure and the conflicts he waded into, from Cambodia's Khmer Rouge to the slaughter in Bosnia to the war-torn Middle East. The result is a peerless portrait of humanity and pragmatism, as well as a history of our convulsive age.

  • Steve Dark is a man with a unique talent for catching serial killers. Now he's on a mission to embrace his destiny, unbound by authorities, moral or otherwise, and supported by a mysterious benefactor with unknown goals of her own.

  • Anglais Our Nig

    Wilson Harriet E

    For the 150th anniversary of its first publication, a new edition of the pioneering African-American classic, reflecting groundbreaking discoveries about its author's life
    First published in 1859, Our Nig is an autobiographical narrative that stands as one of the most important accounts of the life of a black woman in the antebellum North. In the story of Frado, a spirited black girl who is abused and overworked as the indentured servant to a New England family, Harriet E. Wilson tells a heartbreaking story about the resilience of the human spirit. This edition incorporates new research showing that Wilson was not only a pioneering African-American literary figure but also an entrepreneur in the black women's hair care market fifty years before Madame C. J. Walker's hair care empire made her the country's first woman millionaire.

  • The New York Times and international bestseller-now updated with the latest research Anticancer has been a bestselling phenomenon since Viking first published it in fall 2008. Now, a new edition addresses current developments in cancer research and offers more tips on how people living with cancer can fight it and how healthy people can prevent it. The new edition of Anticancer includes: • The latest research on anticancer foods, including new alternatives to sugar and cautions about some that are now on the market • New information about how vitamin D strengthens the immune system • Warnings about common food contaminants that have recently been proven to contribute to cancer progression • A new chapter on mind-body approaches to stress reduction, with recent studies that show how our reactions to stress can interfere with natural defenses and how friendships can support healing in ways never before understood • A groundbreaking study showing that lifestyle modification, as originally proposed in Anticancer, reduces mortality for breast cancer by an astounding 68 percent after completion of treatment • New supporting evidence for the entire Anticancer program

  • Greatly revised and expanded, with a new afterword, this update to Martin Jacques’s global bestseller is an essential guide to understanding a world increasingly shaped by Chinese power
    Soon, China will rule the world. But in doing so, it will not become more Western.
    Since the first publication of When China Rules the World, the landscape of world power has shifted dramatically. In the three years since the first edition was published, When China Rules the World has proved to be a remarkably prescient book, transforming the nature of the debate on China.
    Now, in this greatly expanded and fully updated edition, boasting nearly 300 pages of new material, and backed up by the latest statistical data, Martin Jacques renews his assault on conventional thinking about China’s ascendancy, showing how its impact will be as much political and cultural as economic, changing the world as we know it.
    First published in 2009 to widespread critical acclaim - and controversy - When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order has sold a quarter of a million copies, been translated into eleven languages, nominated for two major literary awards, and is the subject of an immensely popular TED talk.

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